Tokyo Institute of Technology

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Tokyo Institute of Technology articles

Displaying 1 - 17 of 17

Tokyo Tech and Kawasaki City join forces in R&D

Tokyo Tech and Kawasaki City join forces in R&D
Tokyo Institute of Technology and Kawasaki City announced that they are combining forces to conduct R&D, construct an infrastructure, and implement a business promotion program for the "Program to Industrialise an Innovative Middle Molecule Drug Discovery Flow through Fusion of Computational Drug Design and Chemical Synthesis Technology". This highly unique program incorporates computational drug design methods into the field of drug discovery for middle molecules.
9th August 2017

Antiaromatic molecule displays record electrical conductance

Researchers demonstrate high electrical conductance for an antiaromatic nickel complex — an order of magnitude higher than for a similar aromatic complex. Since the conductance is also tunable by electrochemical gating, antiaromatic complexes are promising materials for future electronic devices. Organic materials often have a lower production cost than traditional electric conductors like metals and semiconductors. Not all organic systems conduct electricity well, however.
25th July 2017

Powering the future with all-solid-state batteries

Powering the future with all-solid-state batteries
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have devised a low-cost approach to developing all-solid-state batteries, improving prospects for scaling up the technology for widespread use in electric vehicles, communications and other industrial applications. Ever since batteries were invented over 200 years ago, there has been a drive to improve quality and performance at reduced costs.
14th July 2017


Scanning the surface of lithium titanate

Scanning the surface of lithium titanate
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tohoku University, and the University of Tokyo have applied advanced scanning methods to visualise the previously unexplored surface of a superconductor, lithium titanate (LiTi2O4). LiTi2O4 is the only known example of a so-called spinel1 oxide superconductor. Its rarity makes LiTi2O4 of enormous interest to those studying the origins of superconductivity, as it has the highest superconducting transition temperature (of up to 13.7 K) within this group of materials.
6th July 2017

Biofuel produced by microalgae

Biofuel produced by microalgae
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have identified unique lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases as being the central enzymes for triacylglycerol synthesis by oleaginous alga Nannochloropsis, thus uncovering the mechanisms of biofuel production in microalgae. In the modern society, energy generation heavily relies on fossil fuels, which, however, lead to environmental pollution and depletion of non-renewable resources.
3rd March 2017

Supercomputer TSUBAME3.0 scheduled to operate in summer 2017

Supercomputer TSUBAME3.0 scheduled to operate in summer 2017
  The Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) Global Scientific Information and Computing Center (GSIC) has started development and construction of TSUBAME3.01—the next-generation supercomputer that is scheduled to start operating in the summer of 2017.
22nd February 2017

Hapbeat: tension forces transmit vibrations

Hapbeat: tension forces transmit vibrations
  Excitement felt when listening to music is due to both the sounds heard and, importantly, the vibrations felt by the body. Furthermore, in spite of potentially favorable effects of vibroacoustic devices for listening to music, they are only used in special facilities and are not yet popular for the daily musical experience.
21st February 2017

Unveiling thermoacoustic instability

Unveiling thermoacoustic instability
  Intensive pressure oscillations by thermoacoustic instabilities are critical for the operation of practical gas turbine combustors. However, it is difficult to investigate interactions between turbulent flames and acoustic modes of combustors due to the existence of complex dynamics and their three-dimensional nature.
16th February 2017

Latest aspect of atom mimicry for nanotechnology applications

Latest aspect of atom mimicry for nanotechnology applications
Tokyo Tech researchers show dendrimers that mimic the electron valency of atoms can also mimic polymerisation yielding controlled one and two-dimensional arrays of nanocontainers. In nanotechnology control is key. Control over the arrangements and distances between nanoparticles can allow tailored interaction strengths so that properties can be harnessed in devices such as plasmonic sensors.
6th December 2016

3D solutions provide energy savings in silicon power transistor

Tokyo Tech researchers demonstrate operation energy-savings in a low price silicon power transistor structure by scaling down in all three dimensions. In electronics, lower power consumption leads to operation cost savings, environmental benefits and the convenience advantages from longer running devices. While progress in energy efficiencies has been reported with alternative materials such as SiC and GaN, energy-savings in the standard inexpensive and widely used silicon devices are still keenly sought.
6th December 2016

Imaging probe for fast and sensitive detection of cancer

Imaging probe for fast and sensitive detection of cancer
The ultimate goal of cancer diagnostics is to develop sensitive imaging techniques for reliable detection of tumor malignancy in the body. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have come close to achieving this goal by developing an injectable imaging probe that can specifically detect solid tumors based on the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.
21st October 2016

Boron carrier for targeted tumour therapy

Boron carrier for targeted tumour therapy
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a boron carrier for use in targeted radiation treatment for cancerous tumours. The carrier is based on a common blood plasma protein, meaning it can be tailored to individual patients thus lessening the chances of blood contamination. Targeted radiation-based therapies for treating cancerous tumours such as 'boron neutron capture therapy' (BNCT), rely on the efficient and effective delivery of the capture agent (in this case, boron) to the tumour.
19th August 2016

Bioluminescence is able to detect deep cancers

Bioluminescence is able to detect deep cancers
A team of Tokyo Tech and the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) researchers developed a luciferin analog that can produce bioluminescence with near-infrared wavelength and is applicable in animal experiments. This allows markedly higher target-detection sensitivity, even at very low concentrations. The UEC researchers had previously synthesised a novel luciferin analog, AkaLumine, by altering the chemical structure of D-luciferin.
21st June 2016

Experiments reveal promising nitride semiconductors

Experiments reveal promising nitride semiconductors
Researchers use simulations to identify previously undiscovered semiconductors with promising attributes for optical and electronic applications. A nitride among those proposed has been successfully fabricated using high-pressure synthesis and is found to emit red light. The discovery of new semiconducting materials is a scientifically and technologically important issue; state researchers in Japan in a recent report.
21st June 2016

Solid electrolytes open doors to solid-state batteries

Solid electrolytes open doors to solid-state batteries
Japanese scientists have synthesised two crystal materials that show great promise as solid electrolytes. All-solid-state batteries built using the solid electrolytes exhibit excellent properties, including high power and high energy densities, and could be used in long-distance electric vehicles.
4th April 2016

Hydride-ion conduction has potential for next-gen batteries

Hydride-ion conduction has potential for next-gen batteries
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology in collaboration with colleagues in Japan demonstrate the first electrochemical reaction based on hydride ions in an oxide-based solid-state cell for potential next-gen batteries. Ionic transport has been studied extensively over the years for energy devices such as fuel cells and batteries using Li+, H+, Ag+, Cu+, F–, and O2–. Yet as Genki Kobayashi and Ryoji Kanno point out in a recent report, hydride ions (H-) may be particularly useful for high-energy-density storage devices.
18th March 2016

The world's first pneumatic endoscope manipulator

The world's first pneumatic endoscope manipulator
In August 2015, Riverfield will begin selling the world's first pneumatically controlled surgical assist robot that can smoothly manipulate endoscopes to increase a surgeon's control and precision. Riverfield, a Tokyo-based venture company launched by the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), has built a compact, lightweight and easy-to-use surgical assist robot called EMARO.
17th August 2015


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