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University of California, San Diego articles

Displaying 1 - 17 of 17

Eel-like soft robot can swim silently underwater

Eel-like soft robot can swim silently underwater
An eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists at the University of California can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent. The team, which includes researchers from UC San Diego and UC Berkeley, details their work in Science Robotics.
26th April 2018

Fur real?! Optimised computer rendering of animal fur

Fur real?! Optimised computer rendering of animal fur
The next computer-generated animals in King Kong or The Lion King could look a lot more realistic thanks to a breakthrough by computer scientists at the University of California. The researchers from UC San Diego and UC Berkeley developed a method that dramatically improves the way computers simulate fur, and more specifically, the way light bounces within an animal’s pelt.
22nd February 2018

Lightweight touchscreen pressure sensor arrays

Lightweight touchscreen pressure sensor arrays
Touchscreens on mobile handheld devices can detect if and where a user is touching the screen, but standard technology cannot determine how much pressure is being exerted. Now, researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a new technology for ‘force sensing’ that can be added to any type of display, including flexible devices, and potential other uses go far beyond touch screen displays on mobile devices.
25th January 2018


Gloves powered by soft robotics interact with VR environments

Gloves powered by soft robotics interact with VR environments
Engineers at UC San Diego are using soft robotics technology to make light, flexible gloves that allow users to feel tactile feedback when they interact with VR environments. The researchers used the gloves to realistically simulate the tactile feeling of playing a virtual piano keyboard. Engineers recently presented their research, which is still at the prototype stage, at the Electronic Imaging, Engineering Reality for VR conference in Burlingame, Calif.
31st May 2017

Flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors

Flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors
  Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first printed battery that is flexible, stretchable and rechargeable. The zinc batteries could be used to power everything from wearable sensors to solar cells and other kinds of electronics. The work appears in Advanced Energy Materials.
30th May 2017

3D-printed four legged robot walks on sand and stone

3D-printed four legged robot walks on sand and stone
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first soft robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces, such as sand and pebbles. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can climb over obstacles and walk on different terrains. Researchers led by Michael Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of California San Diego, will present the robot at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation from 29th May to 3rd June in Singapore.
17th May 2017

Acoustic waves move fluids at the nanoscale

Acoustic waves move fluids at the nanoscale
A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components.
15th November 2016

Catheter lets doctors see inside arteries for first time

Removing plaque from clogged arteries is a common procedure that can save and improve lives. This treatment approach was recently made even safer and more effective with a new, high-tech catheter that allows cardiologists to see inside the arteries for the first time, cutting out only the diseased tissue. Interventional cardiologists at Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at UC San Diego Health are the first in the region to use this technology.
28th September 2016

Nanobowls magnetically deliver drugs to specific organs

Nanobowls magnetically deliver drugs to specific organs
Imagine a device that could transport drugs to any diseased site in the body with the help of a small magnet. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have taken a step toward that goal by developing nano-sized vessels, called nanobowls, that could be filled with drug molecules and controlled with magnets for guided delivery to specific tissues and organs, including cancer tissue, small organs such as the pancreas and hard to access areas like the brain.
8th August 2016

Electronic skin patch monitors alcohol levels

Electronic skin patch monitors alcohol levels
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content.
3rd August 2016

Improving extremely small details in computer graphics

Improving extremely small details in computer graphics
The researchers, led by Professor Ravi Ramamoorthi at the University of California San Diego, have created a method to improve how computer graphics software reproduces the way light interacts with extremely small details, called glints, on the surface of a wide range of materials, including metallic car paints, metal finishes for electronics and injection-molded plastic finishes. The method developed by Ramamoorthi and colleagues is 100 times faster than the current state of the art.
21st July 2016

Synthetic membranes could mimic living cells

Synthetic membranes could mimic living cells
Biochemists at the University of California San Diego have developed artificial cell membranes that grow and remodel themselves in a manner similar to that of living mammalian cells. The achievement, detailed in a paper published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, follows the successful design last year in the same laboratory of artificial, or synthetic, cell membranes capable of sustaining continual growth.
19th July 2016

Biosensor chip can detect DNA mutations

Biosensor chip can detect DNA mutations
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed an electrical graphene chip capable of detecting mutations in DNA. Researchers say the technology could one day be used in various medical applications such as blood-based tests for early cancer screening, monitoring disease biomarkers and real-time detection of viral and microbial sequences. The advance was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
14th June 2016

Model offers therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Model offers therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer
In a new study, published in Nature, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, together with colleagues at Keio University, the University of Nebraska and Ionis Pharmaceuticals describe an innovative model that not only allowed them to track drug resistance in vivo, but also revealed a therapeutic target, which early testing suggests could provide a strategy to arrest pancreatic cancer growth.
6th June 2016

The race to save threatened cultural heritage sites

The race to save threatened cultural heritage sites
In January, it was confirmed that St. Elijah's Monastery, the oldest Christian monastery in Iraq, was completely destroyed by ISIS troops after standing for 1,400 years near the city of Mosul. The race is on to digitally preserve thousands of other at-risk sites around the world before they meet a similar fate – but the work doesn't end there for cyber-archaeologists.
17th February 2016

X-ray breakthrough to controlled nuclear fusion

X-ray breakthrough to controlled nuclear fusion
A new technique to monitor a process called 'fast ignition' has been developed, in what could be a critical step towards a viable method of creating controlled nuclear fusion. Fusion ignition, the point at which a nuclear reaction becomes self-sustaining, is one of the great hopes for a new generation of clean, cheap energy generation. 
18th January 2016

3D-printed microfish deliver drugs & remove toxins

3D-printed microfish deliver drugs & remove toxins
Using an innovative 3D printing technology they previously developed, nanoengineers from UC San Diego have manufactured multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots - called microfish - that swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled. According to the researchers, these proof-of-concept synthetic microfish will inspire a new generation of 'smart' microrobots that have diverse capabilities such as detoxification, sensing and directed drug delivery.
22nd September 2015


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