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MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 171

Helping computers fill in the gaps between video frames

Helping computers fill in the gaps between video frames
Given only a few frames of a video, humans can usually surmise what is happening and will happen on screen. If we see an early frame of stacked cans, a middle frame with a finger at the stack’s base, and a late frame showing the cans toppled over, we can guess that the finger knocked down the cans. Computers, however, struggle with this concept.
14th September 2018

Robots can pick up any object after inspecting it

Robots can pick up any object after inspecting it
Humans have long been masters of dexterity, a skill that can largely be credited to the help of our eyes. Robots, meanwhile, are still catching up. Certainly there’s been some progress: For decades, robots in controlled environments like assembly lines have been able to pick up the same object over and over again. More recently, breakthroughs in computer vision have enabled robots to make basic distinctions between objects.
10th September 2018

Encryption techniques protect cloud-based machine learning

Encryption techniques protect cloud-based machine learning
A novel encryption method devised by MIT researchers secures data used in online neural networks, without dramatically slowing their runtimes. This approach holds promise for using cloud-based neural networks for medical-image analysis and other applications that use sensitive data. Outsourcing machine learning is a rising trend in industry.
21st August 2018


Cell-sized robots can sense their environment

Cell-sized robots can sense their environment
Researchers at MIT have created what may be the smallest robots yet that can sense their environment, store data, and even carry out computational tasks. These devices, which are about the size of a human egg cell, consist of tiny electronic circuits made of two-dimensional materials, piggybacking on minuscule particles called colloids. Colloids, which insoluble particles or molecules anywhere from a billionth to a millionth of a meter across, are so small they can stay suspended indefinitely in a liquid or even in air.
25th July 2018

Exoskeletons could make previously unachievable feats a reality

Exoskeletons could make previously unachievable feats a reality
While exoskeletons may still feel like a product of science fiction, they are increasingly becoming a technological reality, and advancements are being made in bringing functioning exoskeletons into the world. 
9th July 2018

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures
Getting robots to do things isn’t easy: Usually, scientists have to either explicitly program them or get them to understand how humans communicate via language. But what if we could control robots more intuitively, using just hand gestures and brainwaves? A system spearheaded by researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) aims to do exactly that, allowing users to instantly correct robot mistakes with nothing more than brain signals and the flick of a finger.
25th June 2018

Smart power outlet can identify plugged-in appliances

Smart power outlet can identify plugged-in appliances
Have you ever plugged in a vacuum cleaner, only to have it turn off without warning before the job is done? Or perhaps your desk lamp works fine, until you turn on the air conditioner that’s plugged into the same power strip. These interruptions are likely 'nuisance trips,' in which a detector installed behind the wall trips an outlet’s electrical circuit when it senses something that could be an arc-fault — a potentially dangerous spark in the electric line.
19th June 2018

Artificial intelligence senses people through walls

Artificial intelligence senses people through walls
X-ray vision has long seemed like a far-fetched sci-fi fantasy, but over the last decade a team led by Professor Dina Katabi from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has continually gotten us closer to seeing through walls. Their latest project, 'RF-Pose,' uses artificial intelligence (AI) to teach wireless devices to sense people’s postures and movement, even from the other side of a wall.
13th June 2018

AI-based method could expedite complex physics simulations

AI-based method could expedite complex physics simulations
A technique developed by MIT physicists could someday provide a way to custom-design multilayered nanoparticles with desired properties, potentially for use in displays, cloaking systems, or biomedical devices. It may also help physicists tackle a variety of thorny research problems, in ways that could in some cases be orders of magnitude faster than existing methods.
4th June 2018

Activity simulator could teach chores to an artificial agent

Activity simulator could teach chores to an artificial agent
For many people, household chores are a dreaded, inescapable part of life that we often put off or do with little care. But what if a robot assistant could help lighten the load? Recently, computer scientists have been working on teaching machines to do a wider range of tasks around the house.
1st June 2018

Fly like an albatross, cruise like a sailboat

Fly like an albatross, cruise like a sailboat
MIT engineers have designed a robotic glider that can skim along the water’s surface, riding the wind like an albatross while also surfing the waves like a sailboat. In regions of high wind, the robot is designed to stay aloft, much like its avian counterpart. Where there are calmer winds, the robot can dip a keel into the water to ride like a highly efficient sailboat instead.
29th May 2018

Task Force studies the evolution of jobs in the age of tech advancement

Task Force studies the evolution of jobs in the age of tech advancement
MIT has launched its Task Force on the Work of the Future, an Institute-wide effort to understand and shape the evolution of jobs during an age of innovation. The task force’s mission was announced in a letter to the MIT community by Provost Martin A. Schmidt. “The MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future takes as a guiding premise that addressing the social and human implications of technology should not be an afterthought".
28th February 2018

Problems with human rights in the workplace? Develop a robot instead!

Problems with human rights in the workplace? Develop a robot instead!
Unpacking groceries is a straightforward albeit tedious task: You reach into a bag, feel around for an item, and pull it out. A quick glance will tell you what the item is and where it should be stored. Now engineers from MIT and Princeton University have developed a robotic system that may one day lend a hand with this household chore, as well as assist in other picking and sorting tasks, from organising products in a warehouse to clearing debris from a disaster zone.
21st February 2018

Chip reduces neural networks’ power consumption by up to 95%

Chip reduces neural networks’ power consumption by up to 95%
Most recent advances in artificial-intelligence systems such as speech- or face-recognition programs have come courtesy of neural networks, densely interconnected meshes of simple information processors that learn to perform tasks by analysing huge sets of training data. But neural nets are large, and their computations are energy intensive, so they’re not very practical for handheld devices.
14th February 2018

To be young, gifted, and black in the eyes of AI

To be young, gifted, and black in the eyes of AI
Three commercially released facial-analysis programs from major technology companies demonstrate both skin-type and gender biases, according to a new paper researchers from MIT and Stanford University will present later this month at the Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency. In the researchers’ experiments, the three programs’ error rates in determining the gender of light-skinned men were never worse than 0.8%.
13th February 2018

Artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardware

Artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardware
  When it comes to processing power, the human brain just can’t be beat. Packed within the squishy, football-sized organ are somewhere around 100 billion neurons. At any given moment, a single neuron can relay instructions to thousands of other neurons via synapses — the spaces between neurons, across which neurotransmitters are exchanged.
25th January 2018

AI allows chatbots to access robust language database

AI allows chatbots to access robust language database
Before coming to MIT, Jeff Orkin SM ’07, PhD ’13 spent a decade building advanced, critically acclaimed AI for video games. While working on F.E.A.R., a survival-horror first-person shooter game, he developed AI that gave computer-controlled characters an unprecedented range of actions. Today, more than 10 years later, many video game enthusiasts still consider the game’s AI unmatched, even by modern standards.
24th January 2018

The top ten tech breakthroughs of 2017

The top ten tech breakthroughs of 2017
It’s been another eventful 12 months in the world of technology. Further ground has been broken in the journey towards autonomous driving and the integration of technology in the healthcare sector. Plus the continued drive for smaller size, lower power devices. This has also been met with further concerns around data security as more and more ‘things’ around us become connected.
2nd January 2018

How do artificial-intelligence systems process language

How do artificial-intelligence systems process language
Neural networks, which learn to perform computational tasks by analysing huge sets of training data, have been responsible for the most impressive recent advances in artificial intelligence, including speech-recognition and automatic-translation systems. During training, however, a neural net continually adjusts its internal settings in ways that even its creators can’t interpret. Much recent work in computer science has focused on clever techniques for determining just how neural nets do what they do.
14th December 2017

Scheme could make high-capacity data caches more efficient

Scheme could make high-capacity data caches more efficient
In a traditional computer, a microprocessor is mounted on a “package,” a small circuit board with a grid of electrical leads on its bottom. The package snaps into the computer’s motherboard, and data travels between the processor and the computer’s main memory bank through the leads. As processors’ transistor counts have gone up, the relatively slow connection between the processor and main memory has become the chief impediment to improving computers’ performance.
23rd October 2017


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