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MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 160

Task Force studies the evolution of jobs in the age of tech advancement

Task Force studies the evolution of jobs in the age of tech advancement
MIT has launched its Task Force on the Work of the Future, an Institute-wide effort to understand and shape the evolution of jobs during an age of innovation. The task force’s mission was announced in a letter to the MIT community by Provost Martin A. Schmidt. “The MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future takes as a guiding premise that addressing the social and human implications of technology should not be an afterthought".
28th February 2018

Problems with human rights in the workplace? Develop a robot instead!

Problems with human rights in the workplace? Develop a robot instead!
Unpacking groceries is a straightforward albeit tedious task: You reach into a bag, feel around for an item, and pull it out. A quick glance will tell you what the item is and where it should be stored. Now engineers from MIT and Princeton University have developed a robotic system that may one day lend a hand with this household chore, as well as assist in other picking and sorting tasks, from organising products in a warehouse to clearing debris from a disaster zone.
21st February 2018

Chip reduces neural networks’ power consumption by up to 95%

Chip reduces neural networks’ power consumption by up to 95%
Most recent advances in artificial-intelligence systems such as speech- or face-recognition programs have come courtesy of neural networks, densely interconnected meshes of simple information processors that learn to perform tasks by analysing huge sets of training data. But neural nets are large, and their computations are energy intensive, so they’re not very practical for handheld devices.
14th February 2018


To be young, gifted, and black in the eyes of AI

To be young, gifted, and black in the eyes of AI
Three commercially released facial-analysis programs from major technology companies demonstrate both skin-type and gender biases, according to a new paper researchers from MIT and Stanford University will present later this month at the Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency. In the researchers’ experiments, the three programs’ error rates in determining the gender of light-skinned men were never worse than 0.8%.
13th February 2018

Artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardware

Artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardware
  When it comes to processing power, the human brain just can’t be beat. Packed within the squishy, football-sized organ are somewhere around 100 billion neurons. At any given moment, a single neuron can relay instructions to thousands of other neurons via synapses — the spaces between neurons, across which neurotransmitters are exchanged.
25th January 2018

AI allows chatbots to access robust language database

AI allows chatbots to access robust language database
Before coming to MIT, Jeff Orkin SM ’07, PhD ’13 spent a decade building advanced, critically acclaimed AI for video games. While working on F.E.A.R., a survival-horror first-person shooter game, he developed AI that gave computer-controlled characters an unprecedented range of actions. Today, more than 10 years later, many video game enthusiasts still consider the game’s AI unmatched, even by modern standards.
24th January 2018

The top ten tech breakthroughs of 2017

The top ten tech breakthroughs of 2017
It’s been another eventful 12 months in the world of technology. Further ground has been broken in the journey towards autonomous driving and the integration of technology in the healthcare sector. Plus the continued drive for smaller size, lower power devices. This has also been met with further concerns around data security as more and more ‘things’ around us become connected.
2nd January 2018

How do artificial-intelligence systems process language

How do artificial-intelligence systems process language
Neural networks, which learn to perform computational tasks by analysing huge sets of training data, have been responsible for the most impressive recent advances in artificial intelligence, including speech-recognition and automatic-translation systems. During training, however, a neural net continually adjusts its internal settings in ways that even its creators can’t interpret. Much recent work in computer science has focused on clever techniques for determining just how neural nets do what they do.
14th December 2017

Scheme could make high-capacity data caches more efficient

Scheme could make high-capacity data caches more efficient
In a traditional computer, a microprocessor is mounted on a “package,” a small circuit board with a grid of electrical leads on its bottom. The package snaps into the computer’s motherboard, and data travels between the processor and the computer’s main memory bank through the leads. As processors’ transistor counts have gone up, the relatively slow connection between the processor and main memory has become the chief impediment to improving computers’ performance.
23rd October 2017

Andorra becomes a 'living lab' for urban innovation research

Andorra becomes a 'living lab' for urban innovation research
Researchers have developed CityScope Andorra, a 3D augmented-reality platform that visualises complex urban data on a small-scale model of the country in real-time. The platform simulates the impact of multiple urban interventions — from urban planning proposals to shared autonomous vehicles — and facilitates civic engagement and decision making.
13th October 2017

Will origami robots perform surgery in the future?

Will origami robots perform surgery in the future?
  Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed origami inspired robots that can fold into many different shapes. The mini robots will be able to carry out different types of surgery, like taking samples, removing objects and patching wounds.
11th October 2017

Magnetic particles enable alternative form of data storage

Magnetic particles enable alternative form of data storage
Research has shown that an exotic kind of magnetic behaviour discovered just a few years ago holds great promise as a way of storing data — one that could overcome fundamental limits that might otherwise be signalling the end of “Moore’s Law,” which describes the ongoing improvements in computation and data storage over recent decades.
3rd October 2017

Robot wears different outfits for different tasks

Robot wears different outfits for different tasks
From butterflies that sprout wings to hermit crabs that switch their shells, many animals must adapt their exterior features in order to survive. While humans don’t undergo that kind of metamorphosis, we often try to create functional objects that are similarly adaptive — including our robots. Despite what you might have seen in “Transformers” movies, though, today’s robots are still pretty inflexible.
3rd October 2017

3D printing software enables evaluation of macroscopic designs

3D printing software enables evaluation of macroscopic designs
The precise control of printed objects’ microstructure gives designers commensurate control of the objects’ physical properties — such as their density or strength, or the way they deform when subjected to stresses. Today’s 3D printers have a resolution of 600 dots per inch, which means that they could pack a billion tiny cubes of different materials into a volume that measures just 1.67 cubic inches. 
4th August 2017

Ultracold molecules could provide 'qubit' material

Ultracold molecules could provide 'qubit' material
Researchers have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers, for certain kinds of problems. The new work shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them, for hundreds of times longer than researchers have previously achieved in these materials.
28th July 2017

AI suggests recipes based on food photos

AI suggests recipes based on food photos
There are few things social media users love more than flooding their feeds with photos of food. Yet we seldom use these images for much more than a quick scroll on our cellphones. Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) believe that analysing photos like these could help us learn recipes and better understand people's eating habits.
21st July 2017

Watch 3D movies at home without special glasses

Watch 3D movies at home without special glasses
While 3D movies continue to be popular in theaters, they haven't made the leap to our homes just yet—and the reason rests largely on the ridge of your nose. Ever wonder why we wear those pesky 3D glasses? Theaters generally either use special polarised light or project a pair of images that create a simulated sense of depth. To actually get the 3D effect, though, you have to wear glasses, which have proven too inconvenient to create much of a market for 3D TVs.
13th July 2017

3D chip merges computing with data storage

3D chip merges computing with data storage
As embedded intelligence is finding its way into ever more areas of our lives, fields ranging from autonomous driving to personalised medicine are generating huge amounts of data. But just as the flood of data is reaching massive proportions, the ability of computer chips to process it into useful information is stalling. Now, researchers at Stanford University and MIT have built a new chip to overcome this hurdle.
6th July 2017

GelSight technology provides robots with a sense of touch

GelSight technology provides robots with a sense of touch
Eight years ago, Ted Adelson’s research group at MIT’s CSAIL unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3D map of its surface. Now, by mounting GelSight sensors on the grippers of robotic arms, two MIT teams have given robots greater sensitivity and dexterity. The researchers presented their work in two papers at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation.
5th June 2017

Aiming at mass-producible quantum computers

Aiming at mass-producible quantum computers
Quantum computers are experimental devices that offer large speedups on some computational problems. One promising approach to building them involves harnessing nanometer-scale atomic defects in diamond materials. But practical, diamond-based quantum computing devices will require the ability to position those defects at precise locations in complex diamond structures, where the defects can function as qubits, the basic units of information in quantum computing.
26th May 2017


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Imagineering Fair at Bath & West Show
30th May 2018
United Kingdom The Royal Bath & West Society Showground, Somerset
PCIM 2018
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SENSOR+TEST 2018
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Germany Nürnberg Exhibition Centre
European Microwave Week 2018
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Spain Ifema Feria De Madrid