KTH Royal Institute of Technology

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KTH Royal Institute of Technology articles

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Quantum secure communication is focus of research centre node

Quantum secure communication is focus of research centre node
The future of secure communication will be in quantum encryption, and KTH will lead research in this area under the auspices of a new national research centre financed by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation. Gunnar Björk, Professor of Photonics at KTH, says that the Wallenberg centre for Quantum Technology is considered to be one of Sweden's largest individual research efforts in recent years.
22nd November 2017

Billion investment in research on artificial intelligence

The initiative Wallenberg Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP), in which KTH is included, is getting substantial capital injection. Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW) will contribute a total of SEK 1 billion. The AI investment can be divided into two parts. The major part, led by Danica Kragic Jensfelt, Professor of Computer Science, will focus on machine learning, deep learning and next generation AI (eXplainable AI).
15th November 2017

STEM studies appeal aimed at teen girls

STEM studies appeal aimed at teen girls
A KTH campaign to promote STEM studies offers a way for students and professionals to reach out to teenage girls with their personal stories and advice. If today you could send a message to yourself at the age of 15, what would you say? Taking advantage of that imaginary opportunity is what lies at the center of a new STEM studies campaign aimed at girls and young women, which was launched by KTH Royal Institute of Technology in March.
8th March 2017


Closer look at atomic motion in molecules

Closer look at atomic motion in molecules
Every molecule holds a complex landscape of moving atoms – and the ability to single out and examine individual nuclear vibrations may unlock to the secret to predicting and controlling chemical reactions. Now, a method, developed by researchers in Sweden, enables biotech researchers to do just that. A method offers unprecedented detail in measuring molecular motion and energy – enabling better control and understanding of chemical reactions in the field of biotech research.
16th February 2017

How does the Earth’s inner core remain solid?

How does the Earth’s inner core remain solid?
Even though it is hotter than the surface of the Sun, the crystallised iron core of the Earth remains solid. A study from KTH Royal Institute of Technology may finally settle a longstanding debate over how that’s possible, as well as why seismic waves travel at higher speeds between the planet’s poles than through the equator. Spinning within Earth’s molten core is a crystal ball – actually a mass formation of almost pure crystallised iron – nearly the size of the moon.
14th February 2017

Innovation hub for global development launched

Innovation hub for global development launched
  Now the ball is rolling for KTH's investment in a training and collaboration model that aims at finding innovative solutions to global challenges. The focus of the KTH Global Development Hub is the exchange and cooperation between KTH and various selected partner universities in sub-Saharan countries.
26th January 2017

Probe offers accurate detection of biomarker for cancer

Probe offers accurate detection of biomarker for cancer
A technique offers better sensitivity and accuracy in detecting an essential biomarker of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Hypochlorous acid HOCl is one of the reactive molecules that our immune system dispatches to attack invading pathogens or potentially harmful irritants. The oxidant is also generated as a result of tissue damage that causes – or even exacerbates – inflammatory diseases such as lung and liver disease, heart attacks, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorder.
8th December 2016

Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution

Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution
For all of its benefit to society, the technology we use for medical imaging is nevertheless flawed. Relevant little details go undetected due to limitations in resolution. But a recent investment in research at KTH aims to improve the picture – by at least 10 times. There are today several ways to explore how our bodies look inside. Computerised tomography (CT) and X-ray are two of the most widely-known techniques.
31st October 2016

Sensors to monitor bridges enable them to tweet

Sensors to monitor bridges enable them to tweet
While bridge collapses are rare, there have been enough of them to raise concerns in some parts of the world that their condition is not sufficiently monitored. Sweden is taking a hi-tech approach to its aging infrastructure. Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm are rigging up the country’s bridges with multiple sensors that allow early detection of wear and tear. The bridges can even tweet throughout the course of a day.
31st October 2016

Low cost method for examining single leukemia cells

Leukemia is a disease in which each cell can exhibit different genetic traits, and now KTH researchers have found a cheap way to examine individual leukemia cells. Reported in Nature Communications, the breakthrough could transform leukemia treatment. Cells are packed with genetic information that can be used to improve treatment of diseases such as cancer, but the RNA sequencing methods typically used today have one limitation: they don’t identify in which cells the genetic activity is taking place.
17th October 2016

Research area could lead to super-fast quantum computers

Research area could lead to super-fast quantum computers
Research that was recognised with the Nobel Prize in Physics this week has spawned an entirely new research area that could lead to super-fast quantum computers. “It’s great that the prize goes toward a field that represents basic research but also is on the verge of many exciting possibilities, says Oscar Tjernber, professor of material physics at KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
12th October 2016

Telescope will investigate mysterious Crab pulsar

Telescope will investigate mysterious Crab pulsar
In the coming days, a telescope designed and built at KTH will be launched into the stratosphere to observe the small pulsar at the centre of the spectacular Crab Nebula. Carried aloft by a 150-diametre helium balloon about 40km above Earth, the telescope will by used by researchers at KTH to determine the polarisation of radiation waves emitted by the Crab pulsar, says Physics Professor Mark Pearce, the project leader at KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
4th July 2016

Robots help each other by using body language

Robots help each other by using body language
Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have completed work on an EU project aimed at enabling robots to cooperate with one another on complex jobs, by using body language. Dimos Dimarogonas, an associate professor at KTH and project coordinator for RECONFIG, says the research project has developed protocols that enable robots to ask for help from each other and to recognise when other robots need assistance - and change their plans accordingly.
28th June 2016

Positioning system will spot early stage Parkinson's disease

A positioning system adapted for use in fire rescue operations will soon be tested on senior citizens in Sweden as a way to spot signs of early stage Parkinson's disease and other mobility problems. Inside the heel of a boot, advanced sensors designed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm make it possible for emergency operations commanders to follow smoke divers' exact movements in any building — even 25 metres below ground.
8th April 2016

Animals inspire innovations in science and engineering

Animals inspire innovations in science and engineering
The technique biomimetics aims to solve problems and create new products by mimicking the way nature and animals do things. And like the animals themselves, examples of biomimetics continue to multiply. By studying termite mounds and their ventilation system, it has been possible to imitate them and design large buildings without air conditioning. Bombardier beetles spray a hot, noxious chemical when frightened, providing an idea for spray bottles for fuel injection in engines.
16th March 2016

Wikipedia develops first crowdsourced speech engine

Wikipedia develops first crowdsourced speech engine
By 2017, English, Swedish and Arabic speakers will find that Wikipedia is talking their language—literally. The online free encyclopedia is collaborating with Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology to develop the world's first crowdsourced speech synthesis platform. The platform will be optimised for Wikipedia but freely available as open source, and readily usable by any site that uses the MediaWiki software on which Wikimedia is based.
10th March 2016

Material enables more reliable self-screening

Material enables more reliable self-screening
Paper-based diagnostics enable rapid medical test results at minimal cost, and now they can get even better. A synthetic paper developed by Swedish researchers could enable simultaneous screenings for multiple conditions, with more reliable results. Microscopic image of the synthetic paper developed at KTH. Developed at KTH, the synthetic paper differs significantly from the most predominant paper diagnostics used today, such as pregnancy tests.
25th February 2016

Tiny cracks in electrodes mean improvements for nanoelectronics

Tiny cracks in electrodes mean improvements for nanoelectronics
Nanogaps could enable new types of microprocessors and make a whole range of biosensors possible, and now researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have published a scalable method using nanocracks for creating nanogaps that are only a few atom layers wide. Valentin Dubois, a researcher at KTH's Department of Micro and Nanosystems, says the new method improves on established ways to achieve gaps in conductive materials — in this case, titanium nitride (TiN).
4th February 2016

Renewable and biodegradable alternative to Styrofoam

Renewable and biodegradable alternative to Styrofoam
Maybe soon we can say goodbye to polystyrene, the petroleum-based material that is used to make Styrofoam. In what looks like an ordinary bicycle helmet, Swedish designers have replaced Styrofoam with a new shock-absorbing material made with renewable and biodegradable wood-based material.
18th January 2016

The intricate relation between fiction and science

The intricate relation between fiction and science
The latest episode of Crosstalks “Imagining the possible” talked about how science inspires fiction and vice versa. The submarine, the helicopter and the atomic power are all inventions that were in some way inspired by the fictional works of authors like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells.
22nd December 2015


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