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University of Texas at Austin Articles

Displaying 1 - 13 of 13
Medical
24th August 2018
Keeping cancer out of breath blocks drug resistance

A combination of existing drugs shows promise that it could reduce the size of cancerous tumours much more effectively than current treatments. As cancer patients know all too well, many effective anti-cancer drugs don’t stay effective long. Most tumours will become drug resistant over time as their cells rapidly mutate. Chemists from The University of Texas at Austin and Korea University have demonstrated a new approach to blocki...

Medical
25th April 2018
Watch your step: how vision leads locomotion

Using technologies to track how vision guides foot placement, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin come one step closer in determining what is going on in the brain while we walk, paving the way for better treatment for mobility impairments — strokes, aging and Parkinson’s — and technology development — prosthetics and robots. Walking on natural terrain takes precise coordination between vision and body mo...

Medical
7th September 2017
'Pen' device accurately identifies cancer in seconds

A powerful tool that rapidly and accurately identifies cancerous tissue during surgery has been invented by a team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin. The tool delivers results in about ten seconds - more than 150 times as fast as existing technology. The MasSpec Pen is an innovative handheld instrument that gives surgeons precise diagnostic information about what tissue to cut or preserve, helping improve ...

Analysis
9th March 2017
Time crystal is the latest form of matter

Salt, snowflakes and diamonds are all crystals, meaning their atoms are arranged in 3D patterns that repeat. Scientists are reporting in the journal Nature on the creation of a phase of matter, dubbed a time crystal, in which atoms move in a pattern that repeats in time rather than in space. The atoms in a time crystal never settle down into what's known as thermal equilibrium, a state in which they all have the same amount of heat.

Medical
24th February 2017
Nano thread enables long-term neural implants

Researcher Dr. Luan and his interdisciplinary team from the University of Texas at Austin have developed an ultra flexible nanoelectronic thread (NET) that has the potential to offer a new type of the long-term neural implants. Neural probes are used to directly measure or even stimulate electrical activity in specific regions of the brain. However, despite the many advances in the field, issues with biocompatibility have limited the prospects an...

Medical
16th February 2017
NET probes form reliable integration with the brain

Engineering researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don't elicit scar formation when implanted. The researchers described their findings in a research article published in Science Advances.

Aerospace & Defence
9th February 2017
Astronomers find faintest early galaxies yet

Astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a technique to discover the faintest galaxies yet seen in the early universe —10 times fainter than any previously seen. These galaxies will help astronomers probe a little-understood, but important period in cosmic history. Their new technique helps probe the time a billion years after the Big Bang, when the early, dark universe was flooded with light from the first galaxies.

Optoelectronics
6th September 2016
Microscope makes 3D images by mapping negative space

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method for making 3D images of structures in biological material under natural conditions at a much higher resolution than other existing methods. The method may help shed light on how cells communicate with one another and provide important insights for engineers working to develop artificial organs such as skin or heart tissue.

Component Management
23rd August 2016
Smart window material controls solar light and heat

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have invented a flexible smart window material that, when incorporated into windows, sunroofs, or even curved glass surfaces, will have the ability to control both heat and light from the sun. Their article about the material will be published in the September issue of Nature Materials.

Power
18th August 2016
Na-ion battery's density approaches that of Li-ion

In a study, researchers have designed and fabricated a sodium-ion full-cell battery that uses sodium titanium oxide nanotubes as the anode material. In addition to greatly reducing the safety risks compared to sodium-ion half-cell batteries, the new battery can store nearly the same amount of energy in a given volume as today's state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries.

Power
22nd July 2016
A glimpse of the inner workings of thin transistors

A team of physicists at The University of Texas at Austin has had the first-ever glimpse into what happens inside an atomically thin semiconductor device. In doing so, they discovered that an essential function for computing may be possible within a space so small that it's effectively one-dimensional. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe seeing the detailed inner workings of a...

Power
19th July 2016
A glimpse of the inner workings of atomically thin transistors

With an eye to the next generation of tech gadgetry, a team of physicists at The University of Texas at Austin has had the first-ever glimpse into what happens inside an atomically thin semiconductor device. In doing so, they discovered that an essential function for computing may be possible within a space so small that it's effectively one-dimensional. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, t...

Analysis
6th July 2016
Determining the fundamental limits of invisibility cloaks

  Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have been able to quantify fundamental physical limitations on the performance of cloaking devices, a technology that allows objects to become invisible or undetectable to electromagnetic waves including radio waves, microwaves, infrared and visible light. 

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