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National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Articles

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5
Medical
9th March 2018
Implanted patches produce organised vascular networks

  When cardiovascular disease causes blocked blood vessels, tissues die because the oxygen carried by blood cells cannot reach the tissue. Tissue starved of oxygen is called ischemic. Surgery can remove blockages in large vessels in the heart or legs but is not possible in small vessels; they are just too small to manipulate.

Medical
2nd March 2018
Introducing diagnosis and treatment at single nerve level

Ingested or injected pharmaceuticals can target specific molecules involved in disease processes, but get distributed throughout the body where they can cause unwanted side effects. An approach known as electroceuticals aims to avoid systemic exposure by using small wires to electrically monitor and manipulate individual nerves that control organ function and carry information about disease.

Medical
10th January 2018
A pain-free way to manage type 2 diabetes

For millions of people with type 2 diabetes, ongoing vigilance over the amount of sugar, or glucose, in their blood is the key to health. A finger prick before mealtimes and maybe an insulin injection is an uncomfortable but necessary routine. Researchers with NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have devised a biochemical formula of mineralised compounds that interacts in the bloodstream to regulat...

Medical
3rd February 2017
Radiotracer makes diagnosing prostate cancer easier

Researchers at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed a new radiotracer to diagnose prostate cancer and conducted a successful Phase I clinical trial. Phase I trials are typically conducted with a small group of people in order to establish safety and identify any possible side effects. Prostate cancer is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and is especially difficult to diagnose.

Wearables
19th October 2016
Wearable tattoo sends alcohol levels to smartphone

Engineers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed a small monitoring device, worn on the skin, that detects alcohol levels in perspiration. It was designed as a convenient method for individuals to monitor their alcohol intake, which could help reduce unsafe drinking that can lead to vehicle crashes, violence, and the degeneration of the health of heavy drinkers.

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