American Chemical Society

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American Chemical Society articles

Displaying 1 - 15 of 15

Insulin pill could ease pain in diabetes treatment

Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. They will share their in vivo testing results. The researchers are presenting their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
24th August 2016

Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure

Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure. But scientists now report they have developed gels that, in animal tests, can be injected into the heart to shore up weakened areas and prevent heart failure.
22nd August 2016

Simple test improves diagnosis of TB in developing nations

Simple test improves diagnosis of TB in developing nations
In developing nations, the current test to diagnose TB is error-prone, complicated and time-consuming. Furthermore, patients in these resource-limited areas can't easily travel back to a clinic at a later date to get their results. To make diagnoses simpler, faster and more accurate, chemists have developed a quick and easy diagnostic tool. Field trials of the experimental test began in June in South Africa, which has a high incidence of TB.
22nd August 2016


Nanoparticles can speed blood clotting

Nanoparticles can speed blood clotting
Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they've validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.
22nd August 2016

Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications

Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications
The developing world is awash in substandard, degraded or falsified medications, which can either directly harm users or deprive them of needed treatment. And with internet sales of medications on the rise, people everywhere are increasingly at risk. So, a team of researchers has developed a simple, inexpensive paper-based device to screen suspicious medications. The researchers will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
22nd August 2016

Compounds could prevent scars from forming

Compounds could prevent scars from forming
Most people start racking up scars from an early age with scraped knees and elbows. While many of these fade over time, more severe types such as keloids and scars from burns are largely untreatable. These types of scars are associated with permanent functional loss and, in severe cases, carry the stigma of disfigurement. Now scientists are developing new compounds that could stop scars from forming in the first place.
22nd August 2016

Portable paper sensor monitors sun exposure

Portable paper sensor monitors sun exposure
Summer is around the corner—time for cookouts and sunbathing. But too much sun can result in sunburn, which is the main cause of skin cancer. Because the time it takes to get burned depends on many factors, it is not easy to tell when to seek shade. To help people stay safe, researchers report in ACS Sensors the development of a paper-based sensor for monitoring sun exposure given different skin tones and sunscreen levels.
25th May 2016

Transparent smart skin could be developed for robots

Transparent smart skin could be developed for robots
Scientists report in the journal ACS Nano a self-powered, transparent smart skin that is simpler and less costly than many other versions that have been developed. Endowing robots and prosthetics with a human-like sense of touch could dramatically advance these technologies. Toward this goal, scientists have come up with various smart skins to layer onto devices.
13th April 2016

Getting closer to using beer hops to fight disease

Hops, those little cone-shaped buds that give beer its bitter flavor, pack a surprisingly healthful punch. They are widely studied for their ability to halt bacterial growth and disease. Now, researchers report that they are close to synthesising the healthful hops compounds in the lab. This advance could one day help scientists create medicines from these compounds without having to extract them from plants.
14th March 2016

Nanomotors could help electronics fix themselves

Nanomotors could help electronics fix themselves
As electronics grow ever more intricate, so must the tools required to fix them. Anticipating this challenge, scientists turned to the body's immune system for inspiration and have now built self-propelled nanomotors that can seek out and repair tiny scratches to electronic systems. They could one day lead to flexible batteries, electrodes, solar cells and other gadgets that heal themselves.
14th March 2016

Spongy material helps repair the spine

Spongy material helps repair the spine
Remember those colorful "grow capsules" that blossom into animal-shaped sponges in water? Using a similar idea, scientists have developed biodegradable polymer grafts that, when surgically placed in damaged vertebrae, should grow to be just the right size and shape to fix the spinal column. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
14th March 2016

Spermbots could help solve male infertility

Spermbots could help solve male infertility
Sperm that don’t swim well rank high among the main causes of infertility. To give these cells a boost, women trying to conceive can turn to artificial insemination or other assisted reproduction techniques, but success can be elusive. In an attempt to improve these odds, scientists have developed motorised 'spermbots' that can deliver poor swimmers — that are otherwise healthy — to an egg. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Nano Letters.
15th January 2016

Sensor made from chewing gum enables flexibility

Body sensors, which were once restricted to doctors’ offices, have come a long way. They now allow any wearer to easily track heart rate, steps and sleep cycles around the clock. Soon, they could become even more versatile - with the help of chewing gum. Scientists report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a unique sensing device made of gum and carbon nanotubes that can move with your most bendable parts and track your breathing.
4th December 2015

Light used to drive battery power safely

Light used to drive battery power safely
To move the world toward sustainability, scientists are continuing to explore ways to use the power of sunlight to make fuels and generate electricity. Now scientists have developed a way in which to use light to drive battery power safely. The battery, reported in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C, uses light and titanium nitride for the anode.
27th July 2015

Nanorobots could swim through blood to deliver drugs

Nanorobots could swim through blood to deliver drugs
Someday, treating patients with nanorobots could become standard practice to deliver medicine specifically to parts of the body affected by disease. However, merely injecting drug-loaded nanoparticles might not always be enough to get them where they need to go. In the ACS journal, Nano Letters, scientists are reporting the development of new nanoswimmers that can move easily through body fluids to their targets.
27th July 2015


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