University of Cambridge

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Phone: 01223 339 670

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University of Cambridge articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 20

Stephen Hawking's PhD thesis viewed two million times

Stephen Hawking's PhD thesis viewed two million times
After being made accessible via the University of Cambridge’s Open Access repository, Apollo, Stephen Hawking’s PhD thesis, Properties of expanding universes, has been made freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world. The 1966 doctoral thesis by the world’s most recognisable scientist is the most requested item in Apollo with the catalogue record alone attracting hundreds of views per month. In just the past few months, the University has received hundreds of requests from readers wishing to download Professor Hawking’s thesis in full.
31st October 2017

Smallest magnifying glass shows chemical bonds between atoms

Smallest magnifying glass shows chemical bonds between atoms
For centuries, scientists believed that light, like all waves, couldn't be focused down smaller than its wavelength, just under a millionth of a metre. Now, researchers led by the University of Cambridge have created the world's smallest magnifying glass, which focuses light a billion times more tightly, down to the scale of single atoms. In collaboration with colleagues from Spain, the team used highly conductive gold nanoparticles to make the world's tiniest optical cavity, so small that only a single molecule can fit within it.
15th November 2016

Next-gen smartphone battery inspired by the gut

Next-gen smartphone battery inspired by the gut
  Researchers have developed a prototype of a next-gen lithium-sulphur battery which takes its inspiration in part from the cells lining the human intestine. The batteries, if commercially developed, would have five times the energy density of the lithium-ion batteries used in smartphones and other electronics.
26th October 2016


Ultralow power transistors could function without battery

A newly-developed form of transistor opens up a range of new electronic applications including wearable or implantable devices by drastically reducing the amount of power used. Devices based on this type of ultralow power transistor, developed by engineers at the University of Cambridge, could function for months or even years without a battery by 'scavenging' energy from their environment.
24th October 2016

Liquid light switch could enable more powerful electronics

Liquid light switch could enable more powerful electronics
Researchers have built a miniature electro-optical switch which can change the spin—or angular momentum—of a liquid form of light by applying electric fields to a semiconductor device a millionth of a metre in size. Their results, reported in the journal Nature Materials, demonstrate how to bridge the gap between light and electricity, which could enable the development of ever faster and smaller electronics.
9th August 2016

Bulk superconductor achieves magnetic field record

Bulk superconductor achieves magnetic field record
Dr Mark Ainslie of the Bulk Superconductivity Group, in conjunction with a Japanese research team, has achieved a bulk superconductor magnetic field record. The record-high trapped magnetic field of 1.1 T at 13 K in a magnesium diboride (MgB2) bulk superconductor using a practical, pulsed-field magnetisation technique comes on the heels of the Bulk Superconductivity Group's previous 2014 world record result, where 17.6 T was achieved in a stack of two Gd-Ba-Cu-O high-temperature superconductors at 26 K using a slower and more expensive, field-cooling magnetisation technique.
25th July 2016

Artificial pancreas to become available by 2018

The artificial pancreas - a device which monitors blood glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes and then automatically adjusts levels of insulin entering the body - is likely to be available by 2018, conclude authors of a paper in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes). Issues such as speed of action of the forms of insulin used, reliability, convenience and accuracy of glucose monitors plus cybersecurity to protect devices from hacking, are among the issues that are being addressed.
1st July 2016

Cambridge Uni team publishes research to improve elderly living

Cambridge Uni team publishes research to improve elderly living
A team of post-graduate students from the University of Cambridge has published research with the potential to transform the lives of millions of older people around the world. The team has made a genuine contribution to society, an experience that will stay with them for the rest of their careers.
25th June 2016

Aim to lead innovation in Europe

Aim to lead innovation in Europe
  A consortium including the Institute for Manufacturing at the University of Cambridge has begun work on a major project to improve innovation processes and their effectiveness in society.
23rd June 2016

Laser technique promises super-secure quantum cryptography

Laser technique promises super-secure quantum cryptography
A method of implementing an 'unbreakable' quantum cryptographic system is able to transmit information at rates more than ten times faster than previous attempts. Researchers have developed a new method to overcome one of the main issues in implementing a quantum cryptography system, raising the prospect of a useable 'unbreakable' method for sending sensitive information hidden inside particles of light.
5th April 2016

Could future buildings be made with bone and eggshells?

Could future buildings be made with bone and eggshells?
As the world grapples with climate change, we urgently need to find ways of reducing our CO₂ emissions. Sectors which rely heavily on fossil fuels, such as energy and aviation, are commonly held to be the worst offenders. But what most people don't realise is that there's another culprit, hiding in plain sight; on the streets of our cities, and in the buildings where we live and work.
9th March 2016

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain
Researchers have successfully demonstrated how it is possible to interface graphene – a two-dimensional form of carbon – with neurons, or nerve cells, while maintaining the integrity of these vital cells. The work may be used to build graphene-based electrodes that can safely be implanted in the brain, offering promise for the restoration of sensory functions for amputee or paralysed patients, or for individuals with motor disorders such as epilepsy or Parkinson’s disease.
16th February 2016

Robots can evolve and be autonomously creative

Robots can evolve and be autonomously creative
According to Fumiya Iida, Lecturer in mechatronics, University of Cambridge, creating artificial intelligence that can design future versions of itself – effectively a robot that can reproduce and evolve – might help us discover innovations that humans might not consider on their own. 
21st December 2015

Artificial pancreas works for length of entire school term

An artificial pancreas given to children and adults with type 1 diabetes going about their daily lives has been proven to work for 12 weeks, meaning the technology, developed at the University of Cambridge, can now offer a whole school term of extra freedom for children with the condition. 
22nd September 2015

First Coding School for Girls was a success

The first Coding School for Girls run by Cambridge University Computer Laboratory and Cambridge Coding Academy, helped 76 girls, aged 15-18 with little or no prior coding experience, design and develop an online game, build Instagram-like image filters and programme drones to fly semi-autonomously. The aim of the one-week coding summer school was to spur excitement in digital innovation and inspire young women to explore opportunities in technology and computer science.
24th August 2015

Mother robot builds and tests its own 'children'

Mother robot builds and tests its own 'children'
Researchers led by the University of Cambridge have built a mother robot that can independently build its own children and test which one does best; and then use the results to inform the design of the next generation, so that preferential traits are passed down from one generation to the next.
13th August 2015

iPad game improves the memory of people with schizophrenia

iPad game improves the memory of people with schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a long-term mental health condition that causes a range of psychological symptoms, ranging from changes in behaviour through to hallucinations and delusions. Psychotic symptoms are reasonably well treated by current medications; however, patients are still left with debilitating cognitive impairments, including in their memory, and so are frequently unable to return to university or work.
10th August 2015

Nanoscale technique enables 'perfect' quantum dot junctions

Nanoscale technique enables 'perfect' quantum dot junctions
Researchers have developed a method for growing ‘hybrid’ crystals at the nanoscale, in which quantum dots - essentially nanoscale semiconductors - of different materials can be sequentially incorporated into a host nanowire with perfect junctions between the components. An approach to self-assemble and tailor complex structures at the nanoscale opens opportunities to tailor properties and functionalities of materials for a wide range of semiconductor applications.
28th July 2015

Students win engineering challenge with queue meter

Students win engineering challenge with queue meter
The University of Cambridge played host to the finals of a new science and electronics engineering challenge for students aged 12-14 from across the east of England. The winners were Chelmsford County High School for Girls (overall winner) and Cambridge’s Stephen Perse Foundation (pupil’s vote) for a queue meter to cut down waiting times and an ‘e-plate’ to aid portion control and monitor food waste. The trophies were presented by Jack Lang.
2nd April 2014

The 20th Cambridge Science Festival looks ahead to the future of science

The 20th Cambridge Science Festival looks ahead to the future of science
Held from Monday 10 to Sunday 23 March at the University of Cambridge, UK, the 20th annual Cambridge Science Festival will attempt to answer many intriguing questions: What’s new in space? Why do coincidences happen? Can science make cyclists go faster? Why do cats make us sneeze? The Science Festival hosts over 250 thought-provoking talks and hands-on events for everyone.
28th January 2014


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