University of Bristol


University of Bristol articles

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Pioneering chip extends sensors' battery life

Pioneering chip extends sensors' battery life
A low-cost chip that enables batteries in sensors to last longer, in some cases by over ten times, has been developed by engineers from the University of Bristol. Dr Bernard Stark and colleagues in the Bristol Electrical Energy Management Research Group based in the Merchant Venturers School of Engineering, have developed a voltage detector chip that requires only a few trillionths of a watt (picowatts) to activate other circuits.
8th February 2017

Nuclear batteries mean 'diamond-age' of power generation

Nuclear batteries mean 'diamond-age' of power generation
Latest technology has been developed that uses nuclear waste to generate electricity in a nuclear-powered battery. A team of physicists and chemists from the University of Bristol have grown a man-made diamond that, when placed in a radioactive field, is able to generate a small electrical current. The development could solve some of the problems of nuclear waste, clean electricity generation and battery life.
28th November 2016

People favour communicative robots over efficient ones

People favour communicative robots over efficient ones
Making an assistive robot partner expressive and communicative is likely to make it more satisfying to work with and lead to users trusting it more, even if it makes mistakes, a study suggests. But the research also shows that giving robots human-like traits could have a flip side - users may even lie to the robot in order to avoid hurting its feelings. Researchers from UCL and the University of Bristol experimented with a humanoid assistive robot helping users to make an omelette.
19th August 2016


Fertility sensor helps women identify ovulation window

Fertility sensor helps women identify ovulation window
A real-time fertility monitor, using technology developed at the University of Bristol, has been launched to help women identify their ovulation window and increase the chances of pregnancy. OvuSense is a sensor and fertility app which measures a woman's core body temperature overnight and then produces a daily graph to identify when a woman is most fertile.
8th August 2016

Bio-ink for 3D printer could produce complex tissues

Bio-ink for 3D printer could produce complex tissues
Scientists at the University of Bristol have developed a kind of bio-ink, which could eventually allow the production of complex tissues for surgical implants. The stem cell-containing bio ink allows 3D printing of living tissue, known as bio-printing. The bio-ink contains two different polymer components: a natural polymer extracted from seaweed, and a sacrificial synthetic polymer used in the medical industry, and both had a role to play.
23rd June 2016

Shape-shifting modular interactive device unveiled

Shape-shifting modular interactive device unveiled
A prototype for an interactive mobile device, called Cubimorph, which can change shape on-demand will be presented this week at ICRA 2016, in Stockholm, Sweden, 16th-21st May. The research led by Dr Anne Roudaut from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bristol, in collaboration with academics at the Universities of Purdue, Lancaster and Sussex, will be presented at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society’s biggest conference.
18th May 2016

Design of primitive quantum computer finds application

Design of primitive quantum computer finds application
Quantum computers have significant potential to open entirely new directions for processing information and to overhaul the way that we think about and use the science of computation. Modern computers already play a huge role in society — they routinely handle and process vast amounts of data and solve calculations at an incredible rate. However, there are some problems that they just cannot solve in a useful amount of time, no matter how fast they become.
12th May 2016

How will people interact with technology in the future?

How will people interact with technology in the future?
A team of researchers led by Professor Mike Fraser and Dr Anne Roudaut from Bristol University’s Bristol Interaction Group (BIG) group, will present six papers at ACM CHI 2016, in San Jose, USA. The conference brings together researchers from universities, corporations and start-ups from across the world and could change the way people interact and collaborate in the future.
11th May 2016

Humanoid robotics could help treat social disorders

Humanoid robotics could help treat social disorders
  A collaborative research team has found humanoid robotics and computer avatars could help rehabilitate people suffering from social disorders such as schizophrenia or social phobia. It is thanks to the theory of similarity, which suggests that it is easier to interact socially with someone who looks, behaves or moves like us.
12th April 2016

Drones could be used to speed up landmine clearance

Drones could be used to speed up landmine clearance
University of Bristol scientists are researching how drones can be used to speed up landmine clearance to demonstrate how large, football pitch-sized areas can be mapped quickly. The research, led by Dr John Day of the Interface Analysis Centre in Bristol’s School of Physics, is funded by Find A Better Way, the charity founded by England and Manchester United legend Sir Bobby Charlton.
11th April 2016

Chemists create mimic of key vision protein

Chemists create mimic of key vision protein
An artificial mimic of a key light-sensitive molecule has been made by scientists at the University of Bristol. The work, published in Science, could lead to ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells. Professor Jonathan Clayden and colleagues in Bristol's School of Chemistry, along with collaborators at the Universities of Manchester and Hull, created an artificial mimic of rhodopsin, a protein that resides in cell membranes in the retina. The absorption of light by rhodopsin is the first step in the biochemistry of vision.
4th April 2016

Ultrasound will transform 3D printing

Ultrasound will transform 3D printing
The advent of 3D printers supposedly means we can manufacture anything in our homes. But in reality most existing home 3D printers can only make things out of certain plastics, although there are industrial systems that can print certain metals. What has so far been out of reach is a way to 3D print high-tech composite materials such as the carbon fibre composites that are used to build lightweight but extremely strong versions of things.
20th January 2016

Haptic controllers are just around the corner

Haptic controllers are just around the corner
Tom Carter creates sounds you can touch. As the co-founder of Bristol-based Ultrahaptics, Carter has developed a technology that uses arrays of speakers, similar to a car's parking sensors, to produce ultrasounds that create tactile sensations. These sonic objects can be "touched" from up to two metres away.
4th January 2016

Engineering students create volcano-monitoring UAS

Engineering students create volcano-monitoring UAS
  Engineering students from the University of Bristol are developing a unique Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) that will be used to monitor the activity of a live volcano in Latin America.
21st September 2015


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