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MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 147

3D printing software enables evaluation of macroscopic designs

3D printing software enables evaluation of macroscopic designs
The precise control of printed objects’ microstructure gives designers commensurate control of the objects’ physical properties — such as their density or strength, or the way they deform when subjected to stresses. Today’s 3D printers have a resolution of 600 dots per inch, which means that they could pack a billion tiny cubes of different materials into a volume that measures just 1.67 cubic inches. 
4th August 2017

Ultracold molecules could provide 'qubit' material

Ultracold molecules could provide 'qubit' material
Researchers have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers, for certain kinds of problems. The new work shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them, for hundreds of times longer than researchers have previously achieved in these materials.
28th July 2017

AI suggests recipes based on food photos

AI suggests recipes based on food photos
There are few things social media users love more than flooding their feeds with photos of food. Yet we seldom use these images for much more than a quick scroll on our cellphones. Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) believe that analysing photos like these could help us learn recipes and better understand people's eating habits.
21st July 2017


Watch 3D movies at home without special glasses

Watch 3D movies at home without special glasses
While 3D movies continue to be popular in theaters, they haven't made the leap to our homes just yet—and the reason rests largely on the ridge of your nose. Ever wonder why we wear those pesky 3D glasses? Theaters generally either use special polarised light or project a pair of images that create a simulated sense of depth. To actually get the 3D effect, though, you have to wear glasses, which have proven too inconvenient to create much of a market for 3D TVs.
13th July 2017

3D chip merges computing with data storage

3D chip merges computing with data storage
As embedded intelligence is finding its way into ever more areas of our lives, fields ranging from autonomous driving to personalised medicine are generating huge amounts of data. But just as the flood of data is reaching massive proportions, the ability of computer chips to process it into useful information is stalling. Now, researchers at Stanford University and MIT have built a new chip to overcome this hurdle.
6th July 2017

GelSight technology provides robots with a sense of touch

GelSight technology provides robots with a sense of touch
Eight years ago, Ted Adelson’s research group at MIT’s CSAIL unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3D map of its surface. Now, by mounting GelSight sensors on the grippers of robotic arms, two MIT teams have given robots greater sensitivity and dexterity. The researchers presented their work in two papers at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation.
5th June 2017

Aiming at mass-producible quantum computers

Aiming at mass-producible quantum computers
Quantum computers are experimental devices that offer large speedups on some computational problems. One promising approach to building them involves harnessing nanometer-scale atomic defects in diamond materials. But practical, diamond-based quantum computing devices will require the ability to position those defects at precise locations in complex diamond structures, where the defects can function as qubits, the basic units of information in quantum computing.
26th May 2017

Bitcoin could help prevent identity theft

Bitcoin could help prevent identity theft
A reaction to the 2008 financial crisis, Bitcoin is a digital-currency scheme designed to wrest control of the monetary system from central banks. With Bitcoin, anyone can mint money, provided he or she can complete a complex computation quickly enough. Through a set of clever protocols, that computational hurdle prevents the system from being coopted by malicious hackers.
24th May 2017

Robot competition feels the power of the Force

Robot competition feels the power of the Force
  In one of MIT’s most eagerly awaited annual events, Thursday night dozens of robots designed and built by undergraduates in a mechanical engineering class endured hours of intense, boisterous, and often jubilant competition as they scrambled to rack up points in one-on-one clashes on special “Star Wars”-themed playing arenas.
16th May 2017

Teaching robots how to teach

Teaching robots how to teach
Most robots are programmed using one of two methods: learning from demonstration, in which they watch a task being done and then replicate it, or via motion-planning techniques such as optimisation or sampling, which require a programmer to explicitly specify a task’s goals and constraints. Both methods have drawbacks. Robots that learn from demonstration can’t easily transfer one skill they’ve learned to another situation and remain accurate.
11th May 2017

Mighty molluscs aid super strength nanocomposites

Mighty molluscs aid super strength nanocomposites
The answer to developing graphene-based nanocomposite materials with enhanced properties could lie within mother-of-pearl and mussel threads. The researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, have employed the structure of mother of pearl (also known as nacre), and the extreme adhesiveness of mussel threads to create a graphene oxide-polydopamine (GO-PDA) composite with improved electrical conductivity and tensile strength.
10th May 2017

Gel material could help control movements of soft robots

Gel material could help control movements of soft robots
A material that naturally adapts to changing environments was inspired by the strength, stability, and mechanical performance of the jaw of a marine worm. The protein material, which was designed and modeled by researchers from the Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics (LAMM) in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), and synthesised in collaboration with the AFRL expands and contracts based on changing pH levels and ion concentrations.
20th March 2017

MIT linguist expands the horizons of language analysis

MIT linguist expands the horizons of language analysis
Many linguistics scholars regard the world's languages as being fundamentally similar. Yes, the characters, words, and rules vary. But underneath it all, enough similar structures exist to form what MIT scholars call universal grammar, a capacity for language that all humans share. To see how linguists find similariites that can elude the rest of us, consider a language operation called "allocutive agreement."
13th March 2017

Next-gen water cooler

Next-gen water cooler
  MIT spinout Bevi believes it can cut the world’s use of bottled drinks with a smart beverage machine of the same name that delivers high quality, flavoured water — straight from the tap. Americans buy about 29 billion water bottles per year, and manufacturers use roughly 17 million barrels of crude oil to produce those bottles.
9th March 2017

Phenomenon accelerates electrons as they enter a viscous state

Phenomenon accelerates electrons as they enter a viscous state
  A finding by physicists at MIT and in Israel shows that under certain specialised conditions, electrons can speed through a narrow opening in a piece of metal more easily than traditional theory says is possible.
7th March 2017

OLYMPUS experiment sheds light on structure of protons

OLYMPUS experiment sheds light on structure of protons
A mystery concerning the structure of protons is a step closer to being solved, thanks to a seven-year experiment led by researchers at MIT. For many years researchers have probed the structure of protons — subatomic particles with a positive charge — by bombarding them with electrons and examining the intensity of the scattered electrons at different angles.
7th March 2017

Artificial data give the same results as real data

Artificial data give the same results as real data
  Although data scientists can gain great insights from large data sets — and can ultimately use these insights to tackle major challenges — accomplishing this is much easier said than done. Many such efforts are stymied from the outset, as privacy concerns make it difficult for scientists to access the data they would like to work with.
6th March 2017

VR system for the elderly wins health care prize

VR system for the elderly wins health care prize
VR is quickly gaining steam in the gaming industry. But an MIT startup is now aiming the technology at a different demographic, putting it to use as a health care tool for the elderly. At last night’s MIT Sloan Healthcare Innovations Prize pitch competition, Rendever earned the $25,000 grand prize for creating a VR platform that gives residents in assisted-living facilities the chance to explore the world virtually.
28th February 2017

Design reduces resting power consumption by 50%

Design reduces resting power consumption by 50%
  At the International Solid-State Circuits Conference, researchers from MIT’s Microsystems Technologies Laboratories (MTL) presented a power converter that maintains its efficiency at currents ranging from 500 picoamps to 1 milliamp, a span that encompasses a 2,000,000-fold increase.
20th February 2017

Chip could make speech recognition ubiquitous in electronics

Chip could make speech recognition ubiquitous in electronics
In anticipation of the age of voice-controlled electronics, MIT researchers have built a low-power chip specialised for automatic speech recognition. Whereas a cellphone running speech-recognition software might require about 1 W of power, the new chip requires between 0.2 and 10 milliwatts, depending on the number of words it has to recognise. In a real-world application, that probably translates to a power savings of 90 to 99%, which could make voice control practical for relatively simple electronic devices.
20th February 2017


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